Archive for the 'People' Category

You are currently browsing the archives of .

Adelaide Fringe Review 2017 – Bad Luck Cabaret

Under a blanket of electro-industrial beats, Laurie Black struts onto the stage with a degree of PVC clad-menace and Alexander McQueen style, but the minute she opens her mouth and her affable sing-song Londoner accent spills out we know immediately that we are among friends at The Bad Luck Cabaret.

Introduction aside, she launches into her first number which is more poetic than melodic – but it was hard beat British verse in keeping with the Kate Tempest school of delivery. My monochromatic days in the 90’s Doom Generation clearly still have nihilistic currency, as Laurie lists the Bad Luck Generation’s barriers to opportunity and a hopeful future. Yep, it’s still the fucking Boomer’s fault.

scaled_Bad_Luck_Square

Laurie is a musical box of surprises, once the handle is cranked you don’t quite know what might come out. Showing us she can rock a keyboard with every appendage, we got a number about pseudo-sapphic pianophilic tendencies that hit my keys as she tunefully rattled off the models & specifications that made her the woman she is today. Audience participation was also mandatory as she tackled the addictive qualities of fascist-leaning felines in assembled IKEA packaging systems, especially when broadcast on the interwebz.

But this is cabaret – so rather than monopolise the limelight we were firstly granted an audience with Jamie Mykaela. Armed with ukulele, bitter memories, and birdsong in her lungs, her magical powers included long-range stink eye and a bucket of A-grade whimsy to feed the appreciative masses.

Second guest of the evening was the statuesque & startling Jennifer Kingwell – who ravaged the keyboard mercilessly to a Tom Waits cover, and then enlightened us to the phenomenon of Radical Activist Cheerleading by enchanting us with a so-themed love song. Apparently Melbourne’s loss is now Adelaide’s gain – the terms and conditions are quite clear, Victoria can’t have her back.

The Bad Luck Cabaret clearly got the Fortune Cookie tonight that says “You are very talented in many ways”. That or “Your shoes will make you very happy today”, because we are just downright pleased they came to RAdelaide.
Over a week of performances left, no excuses not to get along to one!

Posted by Jonathan on Mar 9th 2017 | Filed in Cabaret,Culture,Music,People,Reviews | Comments (0)

Adelaide Fringe Review 2017 – Becky Lou’s Real Woman

It is rare to attend a burlesque show and find one is in fact witness to a journey akin to Inanna’s Descent Into the Underworld. Just as the Goddess of Love, War, Fertility & Wisdom is forced to shed garments the deeper into the chthonic realms she descends, so too Becky Lou’s “Real Woman” sheds the accoutrements of her Art to face a climatic realisation of self-knowledge.

Burlesque may be glamour, but the root meaning of glamour also pertains to illusion. For many, the illusion is important (and valid) because it is aspirational fantasy. And clearly amongst the burlesque sorority (and emerging fraternity) bonds are made between performers of rare strength. But what happens when one achieves reputation as a strong powerful woman, independent, free and artistic – but emotionally your innermost being still feels like a stage kitten, picking up after the main act?

Becky L

Real Woman is therefore not a burlesque cabaret performance as such, but it is a show about burlesque – in so much as it has been an important way point on a bigger expedition.

She openly reminisces on the projections ingrained into young women as teenagers through to their thirties, which may trigger your own memories about how you learned sexual realpolitik, the power imbalances in gender, and how you overcame the societal programming. Or maybe you didn’t? Or maybe you were on the other side of that equation? On the turn of an anecdote we frequently slid from hilarity to deep introspective thought. Or tears. Our silences were the bookmarks between her time-travelling chapters.

Let it be said, Becky is a cabaret psychopomp who never carelessly played with our emotions, but gave us our own informed opportunity to engage with them. And I hasten to add, that she refused to leave us in the underworld. Kicking and screaming we were regularly dragged from melancholy into rapturous delight, a seasonal & cyclical re-emergence into the upper world.

Expect this show to make you laugh and cry simultaneously. And it is going to feel awkward. That may be something to be thankful for.  There is an excellent run of shows left over the remainder of the Adelaide Fringe Festival.

Posted by Jonathan on Mar 8th 2017 | Filed in Burlesque,Cabaret,People,Reviews,Theatre | Comments (0)

Next »